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fiji suva grand pacific hotel facade Suva

Fiji, Pacific

Welcome to Fiji’s capital and the largest and most populated city in the South Pacific. Unlike its more far-flung islands, Suva ...

string(1851) "Welcome to Fiji’s capital and the largest and most populated city in the South Pacific. Unlike its more far-flung islands, Suva offers a buzzing cosmopolitan atmosphere, brimming with colonial buildings, modern shopping plazas, a plethora of restaurants, farmers markets and entertainment, culminating in a truly exotic urban metropolis. Delve into the rich and diverse cultural influences that thrive here; a wonderful blend of Indian, Fijian, Chinese and Japanese culture. Full of history, Suva is well worth a visit when you land in Nadi before moving onto the other islands, to find out more about the island nation itself; from its remnants of colourful colonial architecture to the Fiji Museum showcasing the archaeological, linguistic, political and cultural history of the Fijian archipelago. For the foodies, Suva offers an eclectic range of dining spaces, from affordable cafes and hangouts, to fine dining restaurants. As the day turns to night, Suva boasts an admirable selection of bars and clubs, with the O’Reillys bar reigning as a popular spot amongst locals and visitors. For exploring the city, the Tropic Towers Apartments couldn’t be more convenient and affordable; great for families, business travellers, tour groups or holidaymakers, this is the perfect base from which to soak up all of the cultural, historical and cosmopolitan experiences you’re sure to have here. Convenience is the name of the game here, and Holiday Inn in Suva not only boasts harbour views, but is just steps away from the best of the city’s attractions. For those looking for an added grand touch, the captivating Grand Pacific Hotel gives guests a taste of colonial grandeur and impeccable service and is widely recognised as a gem of the South Pacific, delivering the wonder of old-world charm. There’s something for everyone in Suva."
Micronesia Marshall Islands Diving & Snorkelling Marshall Islands

Micronesia, Pacific

Marshall Islands, also known as Majol is an island nation in the Central Pacific Ocean. There are more than 1200 islands and islet...

string(2834) "Marshall Islands, also known as Majol is an island nation in the Central Pacific Ocean. There are more than 1200 islands and islets in two parallel chains of coral atolls. Marshall Islands were settled around the beginning of the Christian era, some 2000 years ago by Micronesians. The islands were later sighted by a Spanish navigator in 1529. British naval captains explored the Marshall Islands in 1788 and did some mapping. More mapping was done by Russians in the early 1800s. U.S. and Hawaiian missionaries began efforts to convert the islanders in the mid 1800s, and even Germany had inf luence in the islands in the late 1880s. Japan seized the islands in 1914, and remained until the United States liberated the Marshalls during WWII. From 1947 to 1986, the islands remained under the jurisdiction of the United States. Then it became the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and remains friends of the USA with a Compact of Free Association. From 1948 to 1958, the US conducted nuclear tests on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The USA continues to be the protector of The Marshalls, and maintains a missile range and base on the island of Kwajalein. To get to the Marshall Islands, there are two major airlines f lying in daily, United Airlines and Nauru Airlines. Air Marshalls f ly routes between the Atolls in small commuter propeller planes. The only two islands that have an international airport are Majuro and Kwajalein. Boats are used to traverse between the atolls also. Government owned ships make scheduled trips between the islands, and other commercial cargo lines service the islands. Majuro has a commercial dock complex, and many of the outer islands have lagoons that ships can anchor in. Marshall Islands offers tremendous outdoor activities that are exciting, adventurous, and historic. The beaches are some of the most beautiful in the world and are surrounded by crystal clear water for swimming, snorkelling, and wildlife viewing. The water remains warm all year long. There are many historic sites from WWII scattered among the outer islands and day trips and longer excursions can be made to these sites from the capital city of Majuro. Other adventurous activities include joining in on year round cultural events and engaging with friendly locals. Visitors also enjoy shopping for local handicrafts with an array of beautiful baskets, jewelry and decorations. The islanders are known for their weaving using pandanus leaves, coconut fonds and shells. Throughout the Marshall Islands there are many choices for hotel or bed and breakfast accommodation. On Majuro you will discover a range or hotels with a variety of services and rooms. There are also many exciting opportunities to experience the outer islands and distant atolls and to meet the people of the Marshall Islands. "
Central Vietnam Central Vietnam

Vietnam, Asia

Da Nang is central Vietnam’s largest city and is home to some extremely picturesque sites including the Ngu Hanh Son (Five Eleme...

string(3909) "Da Nang is central Vietnam’s largest city and is home to some extremely picturesque sites including the Ngu Hanh Son (Five Element Marble Mountains) which lie close to the sea and have caves and pagodas, and Da Nang Beach which stretches for several kilometres between Monkey Mountain and Marble Mountain. The city of Da Nang is surrounded by the three UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Sites of Hoi An, Hué and My Son. Thirty-two kilometres south-east of Da Nang is the ancient town of Hoi An, an important international port from the 17th to 19th centuries and now Vietnam’s most popular destination beyond Hanoi and Saigon. Its combination of charming heritage streets and riverside setting, bustling markets, Chinese assembly halls, Japanese remnants, quaint restaurants and cafés, and local tailors and handicraft outlets, have made it a must-see for visitors to Vietnam. It is also a rapidly developing beach resort, with a huge stretch of beach just five kilometres from the town and many modern resorts. Outside Hoi An is My Son Sanctuary, the capital of the kingdom of Champa from the 5th to 12th centuries. From here, there’s a great view of Champa from the Mountain Church (Nha Tho Nui) which is on top of Buu Chau Hill in the town of Tra Kieu. Hué, located approximately a 2.5 hour drive north of Da Nang, is widely regarded as the most beautiful city in Vietnam. Hué is situated alongside a large, deep river adjacent to a mountain range. Traditionally Hué was one of the country’s cultural, religious and educational centres, and was also Vietnam’s capital from the years 1802 to 1945. The city of Hué is known worldwide as an architectural treasure with palaces, royal tombs and mausoleums, pagodas, and temples all framed by the natural landscape on either side of the Huong (Perfume) River. The ruins of its huge, moated citadel contains many interesting sites, such as the Nine Holy Cannons, the Imperial Enclosure, the Palace of Supreme Harmony and the Halls of the Mandarins, although the Emperor’s Getaway, the Purple Forbidden City, was largely destroyed during the wars. The Royal Tombs are 15 kilometres south of Hué. One of Vietnam’s best beaches, Thuan An is just 13 kilometres north-east of Hué, and from here visitors can take sampan trips up the Perfume River. From Hué, tourists can go by car to visit the Ho Chi Minh Trail and the remarkable tunnels of Vinh Moc, used during the wars. The Hai Van Pass divides North and South Vietnam. A 21 kilometre-long road over Hai Van Pass, opened at the end of the 19th century, winds back and forth to a height of 435 metres above sea level. Its name means ’Pass of the Ocean Clouds,’ since the peak of the mountain is in the clouds while its foot is close to the sea. Hai Van is considered to be the largest frontier post in Vietnam From the top of the pass, one can admire Lang Co Beach to the north and Da Nang to the south. The curving railway through Hai Van Pass is 3200 metres long with sections running through seven tunnels. There are endless forests to the west of the pass and the ocean is to the east. Hai Van Pass is a real challenge for drivers, as well as for adventurers. Dalat located in the Central Highlands region is renown for its relaxing, natural verdant environment. A popular tourist destination, it is probably one of Vietnam’s best-known vacation sites and is a popular honeymoon mecca. The many sites include Emperor Bao Dai’s Summer Palace and the colourful fresh food and flower markets. Picturesque crumbling French Villas from the 1930s dot the surrounding hillsides. Nha Trang is on the south central coast of Vietnam and arguably boasts the best beach in the country. Its turquoise waters are perfect for swimming and boat trips are available to interesting offshore fishing villages and islands including Monkey Island with diving options also available."
Pacific Tahiti SofitelBora-Bora Private Island 4 Bora Bora

Islands of Tahiti, Pacific

The warm shallow water of Bora Bora’s majestic lagoon is world famous for its unspoiled beauty. Pristine white sand beaches line...

string(2175) "The warm shallow water of Bora Bora’s majestic lagoon is world famous for its unspoiled beauty. Pristine white sand beaches line the main island and its motus (islets), providing the perfect backdrop for sunloving travellers. Bora Bora lies 240 kilometres northwest of Tahiti in the Leeward Society Islands and impresses from the moment it comes into view on the short 50–minute flight from Tahiti. An exhilarating landing on a nearby motu emphasises the height of the island’s towering peak as well as the stunning array of greens and blues that make up Bora Bora’s famed lagoon. A short ride in a boat launch is all it takes from the airport on Motu Mute to Vaitape Village on the main island. Local transport options include a local bus, known as Le Truck, or minivans to the numerous accommodation options available on Tahiti’s most developed island. Resorts, hotels, pensions and camping grounds offer a host of tours and activities to keep visitors entertained, from outrigger speed canoe excursions and scuba diving, to picnics on motus, catamaran cruising and barbecue parties. Travellers can opt to browse local boutiques or discover the island’s secrets independently on foot. A boat trip around the lagoon provides endless opportunities to snorkel and explore small motus on the way, and arrive in time to watch the regular feeding of sharks only a few metres away. Deep-sea fishing off the sheltered waters of Bora Bora offers the chance to catch marlin, yellowfin, tuna, sailfish, wahoo and mahi mahi. Bora Bora is dotted with several maraes, temples of the ancient Polynesian religion. The most important marae is Marae Marotetini on the point west of Farepiti wharf, beyond a huge banyan tree. There is only one navigable pass on Bora Bora. It faces the principal village of Vaitape. A partially paved road circles the island passing colourful villages, archaeological sites, army bunkers and cannons remaining from World War II when 5000 American GIs arrived to defend the island. The boutiques in many of the hotels are well stocked with suntan lotion, film, T-shirts, pareus, souvenirs and black pearls for that retail fix. "
North of Thailand's local foods Noerthern Mariana Island’s Cuisine

Northern Mariana Islands, Micronesia, Pacific

Being a part of the U.S, you can expect a wide range of American cuisine. So if you are a western tourist, you will ...

string(898) " Being a part of the U.S, you can expect a wide range of American cuisine. So if you are a western tourist, you will find familiar food here. There are many restaurants that serve American and American fast food is also available. Don’t forget to try the local delicacies like apigi, which is young coconut roasted in banana leaves, chicken kelaguen (shredded chicken, onions with lemon seasoning, served with tortillas). Many of the local dishes are garnished with a local pepper called donne sali. There is even a Hard Rock Cafe in Saipan Island (talk about international choices!). Do note that you can’t buy alcohol in the Northern Mariana Islands if you are less than 21 years old. You can easily get beers like Miller, Budweiser, Victoria and Fosters. Other brands like Sapporo, Corona, San Miguel, Tsingtao are also available. "
Palau-Island-Picture Palau

Micronesia, Pacific

This pristine paradise is a dream destination. Like giant green mushrooms scattered across a tranquil turquoise lagoon, the lim...

string(2610) "This pristine paradise is a dream destination. Like giant green mushrooms scattered across a tranquil turquoise lagoon, the limestone Rock Islands of Palau seen from the air are one of the most exquisite creations of nature found in the world. The spectacular Rock Islands Southern Lagoon was inscribed onto the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2012. But that’s just the beginning. From sunburnt volcanic savannahs to forests concealing endemic plant and bird life, to coral atolls and reefs teeming with marine life, the Republic of Palau is truly Nature at her most majestic. Within this archipelago is a marine diversity higher than most of Micronesia. Sharks thrive in waters that in 2009 became the world’s first shark sanctuary, setting an example that has been followed by many other island destinations. Palau’s rare dugong, known locally as the mesekiu, as well as endangered species such as the hawksbill turtle, or the chambered nautilus, a deep water shell species that inhabits only a few Pacific islands, can be found here. Not only does Palau protect its marine life, it puts new species on the lists. Trapped in an enclosed body of water, the mastigias of Jellyfish Lake have completely lost their sting because they have not had to repel predators. Instead, they spend their days in privileged leisure, pulsating gently from one side of the marine lake to the other while catching the sun’s rays and farming their own food supply of algae. Snorkelling surrounded by them is fascinating and surreal. Discovered in one of Palau’s deep underwater caves, a prehistoric eel was named Protoanguilla Palau as recently as 2011. Rainbow-filled walls and channels on the fringe reef provide homes for at least 1450 species of reef fish and 400 species of reef-building hard corals, as well as 150 species of soft corals, gorgonians, and sea pens. Some of the famous residents and visitors include manta rays, black or red snappers, napoleon wrasse, bumphead parrot fish and pelagic species including the colossal whaleshark, marlins, and tornados of schooling barracudas. Outside of the reef are sports fishing opportunities beyond your wildest dreams and fully equipped charters to bring back the proverbial “big one”. A democratic country that still abides by its culture and traditional leadership, Palauan villages were, and still are, traditionally organised around matrilineal clans. Men and women had defined roles. A council of chiefs governs the villages, while a parallel council of women holds an advisory role in the control of land, money and the selection of chiefs."

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